Date of Award

2012

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Expressive Therapies

Abstract

In this research study, a sample of normally functioning adults (N = 30) each made a series of small drawings, one each week for 10 weeks. Participants completed two questionnaires about their experiences of making the series. The pre-intervention questionnaire collected demographic information and asked participants to rate their perceived ability to use drawing for self-expression on a Likert scale. The post intervention questionnaire again asked participants to rate their perceived ability to use drawing for self-expression. Results indicated a significant change from pre to post intervention (p = 0.012) in perceived expressive drawing ability. The post intervention questionnaire also collected data about the specific techniques employed. Participants indicated that fun/enjoyment and calming were the most important advantages. The most cited helpful suggestion was that drawing can be used for self-expression. The small size of the drawing cards was rated as the most popular element. Qualitative data supported the idiosyncratic ways that participants used drawing for self-expression. Overall findings provided evidence of the ways that normally functioning adults can be supported to experience and value self-expressive drawing. Within the context of positive psychology this study contributes to research findings about the well being and optimal functioning of participants.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Language

English

Number of Pages

107

Included in

Art Therapy Commons

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