Presenter Information

Nataliya RyzhenkoFollow

Author Type

Staff/Researcher

Location

U-Hall 2-078 or Atrium

Start Date

28-3-2018 12:10 PM

End Date

28-3-2018 1:00 PM

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Vermicomposting is the process of decomposing vegetable and other food waste using earthworms.

We investigate apparatus for in-situ vermicomposting and vary diet parameters to understand optimal conditions for soil fertilization.

As a pilot project, we created a small in-situ vermicomposting apparatus which can be used in a home or at a small farm. In this setting, we need to ensure that the setup does not produce repulsive odor, since it is meant to be kept indoors. Also, the setup should be easily maintained: the food waste easily added, and the bedding kept moist.

Based on results seen, in-situ vermicomposting farm produces stronger plants (based on diameter of tomato stems and growth rate) than regular non-fertilized soil. It has been found that preferred diet for the earthworms in the farm is that high in fiber rather than the one composed of mostly protein and carbohydrates.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Mar 28th, 12:10 PM Mar 28th, 1:00 PM

Developing New apparatus for in-situ vermicomposting and varying diet parameters to understand optimal conditions for soil fertilization.

U-Hall 2-078 or Atrium

Vermicomposting is the process of decomposing vegetable and other food waste using earthworms.

We investigate apparatus for in-situ vermicomposting and vary diet parameters to understand optimal conditions for soil fertilization.

As a pilot project, we created a small in-situ vermicomposting apparatus which can be used in a home or at a small farm. In this setting, we need to ensure that the setup does not produce repulsive odor, since it is meant to be kept indoors. Also, the setup should be easily maintained: the food waste easily added, and the bedding kept moist.

Based on results seen, in-situ vermicomposting farm produces stronger plants (based on diameter of tomato stems and growth rate) than regular non-fertilized soil. It has been found that preferred diet for the earthworms in the farm is that high in fiber rather than the one composed of mostly protein and carbohydrates.