Abstract

When we think about identity as the personal marker that defines us as individuals, it is impossible to divorce perception from its maker. As firm as identity is, it's malleability is apparent within the context of interpersonal relations, both personally and professionally. Each of us perceives the world uniquely, using lenses that fit our individual values, ethical and moral codes. That perception is also colored by our individual histories, and those moments filled with emotional fervor. How we are perceived will often mirror what we choose to reveal in different social contexts. However, when we leak aspects of our personalities that conflict with one another, spaces where the rational and emotional clash, perception can become frail. We propose that this is due in large part to our self-perception. How we perceive ourselves is a product of both nature and nurture to some varying degrees. While our backgrounds and cultures will help shape our identities and tendencies to individualize, we are often socialized to adapt to the norms of our chosen environments. And although our social connections help define the rules by which social progress can occur, fixed self-perceptions that outlie those shared by the great majority can stymie change in ways that can be devastating. We will examine these ideas within the context of Educational Leadership, to understand how cemented, self-perceptions with power – perceived or actual – influence a majority group.

Author Type

Graduate Student

Start Date

28-3-2018 9:10 AM

End Date

28-3-2018 10:00 AM

Presentation Type

Paper

Disciplines

Arts and Humanities | Education

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Mar 28th, 9:10 AM Mar 28th, 10:00 AM

Educational Leadership: When Self-Perception Stymies Social Progress

U-Hall 3-098

When we think about identity as the personal marker that defines us as individuals, it is impossible to divorce perception from its maker. As firm as identity is, it's malleability is apparent within the context of interpersonal relations, both personally and professionally. Each of us perceives the world uniquely, using lenses that fit our individual values, ethical and moral codes. That perception is also colored by our individual histories, and those moments filled with emotional fervor. How we are perceived will often mirror what we choose to reveal in different social contexts. However, when we leak aspects of our personalities that conflict with one another, spaces where the rational and emotional clash, perception can become frail. We propose that this is due in large part to our self-perception. How we perceive ourselves is a product of both nature and nurture to some varying degrees. While our backgrounds and cultures will help shape our identities and tendencies to individualize, we are often socialized to adapt to the norms of our chosen environments. And although our social connections help define the rules by which social progress can occur, fixed self-perceptions that outlie those shared by the great majority can stymie change in ways that can be devastating. We will examine these ideas within the context of Educational Leadership, to understand how cemented, self-perceptions with power – perceived or actual – influence a majority group.