Date of Award

Spring 5-18-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

MA - Master of Arts

Department

Expressive Therapies

Advisor

Meg Chang

Abstract

Arts-based-embodied research was used to investigate the potential effectiveness of Dance Movement Psychotherapy methods to treat substance use disorder from a trauma-informed and cultural approach, based on subjective/objective findings of the writer. Residents of diverse demographics, aged 26-59, within the cultural region volunteered to attend one or more of the three workshops offered. Methods were created based on theoretical, historical, and clinical research and implemented through workshops with the intent to promote community, self-expression, empathy, and creativity-all beneficial traits for on-going mental/physical health recovery and resiliency. Movement observation and participant feedback indicated overall increased awareness and deeper knowing of self and other, reduced feelings of physical/mental stress, and renewed confidence and curiosity. Discoveries supported embodied, arts-based research to reflect and process new knowledge to develop and implement future dance/movement psychotherapy research and future applications in the treatment and on-going recovery of persons with substance use disorder in the Appalachian cultural region.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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