Violence Against Women: Representations, Interpretations, Explorations/Education

Gallery Exhibition & Conference

Gallery Exhibition: November 1st to December 2nd, 2018 in Lunder Arts Center
Exhibition Panel:November 8th (6-7:30 PM) in the lower-level screening room of University Hall (U-Hall)
Reception: Lunder Arts Center following the Exhibition Panel
Conference: November 9th in University Hall (U-Hall)
Schedule

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2018
Friday, November 9th
10:45 AM

A Scholar’s Reflection on Intimate Partner Violence in the Cape Verdean Community

Dawna M. Thomas, Simmons University

Room 3-085

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have brought about a social shift and cultural change that validates women and men who have reported sexual abuse in the workplace and other forms of abuse, including intimate partner violence. This movement follows in the footsteps of several decades of other pioneers who advocated and fought for survivors of all types of abuse. Their efforts have not only increased public awareness, but also brought about legislation, support systems, and a greater understanding regarding the complexity of intimate partner violence. Yet culturally diverse communities such as the Cape Verdean community continue to face a variety of complex challenges and barriers in addressing violence against women and children. Intimate partner violence is a well-known secret in the Cape Verdean community, yet unveiling this secret has been slow, often leaving families suffering in silence, their needs unmet. This paper presents The Cape Verdean Women’s Project (CVWP), a qualitative study with 50 women between the ages of 18-80. Findings are reported about Cape Verdean women’s perceptions of intimate violence, women’s strength and resilience, code of silence, and culture and violence. The paper chronicles the author’s experiences reporting research findings from the CVWP; the research was met with a combination of silence, resistance, acceptance, and support. The paper concludes with recommendations for future community engagement.

Breaking the Silence: Discussions about Disability, Sex, & Gender Identity

Janet Sauer, Lesley University
Kirsten Bond, Lesley University
Cassidy Donahue, Lesley University
Molly Wolber, Lesley University
Hannah Hunter, Lesley University
Elizabeth Bellin, Lesley University
Katherine Deluga, Lesley University

Room 2-078

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Silence often accompanies topics about disability, sexuality, and gender identity. This panel of Lesley students, alumni, and faculty discuss the issue of silence involving social stigma and ignorance that can often lead to violence against people with disabilities. The panelists participated in an interdisciplinary course, Disability Studies, in which students chose to research these topics for their social action projects and papers. Panelists who see themselves as allies and/or self-identify as disabled share their research, personal experiences, and interviews with the audience to provide insights into some of the systematic exclusion of people with disabilities in these discussions, particularly in K-16 curriculum. Students describe the mistreatment of people with disabilities who were institutionalized and forcibly sterilized in the United States as recently as the 1970s, and the disproportionately high rates of violence perpetuated against women with disabilities compared with nondisabled women (National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 2018). They also share direct quotes from young adults with intellectual disabilities about their educational experiences as well as describe identity issues at the intersections of disability and gender preferences. This session provides participants with historical and current information, resources, and recommendations for how we might advocate for accessible and meaningful education, inclusive curricula, and safety planning suggestions.

Gender Violence and Course & Curriculum Design: Performing a Feminist Pedagogy

Mariela Mendez, University of Richmond
Mari Lee Mifsud, University of Richmond
Erika Zimmermann, University of Richmond

Room 2-048

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

This workshop presents participants with an undergraduate curriculum and an evolving toolkit – a feminist pedagogy (Ahmed, 2017) – to articulate specific ways the presenters are incorporating the study of gender violence while exploring ideas of collective action. The curriculum focus emerged from a program review and the critical need for universities to respond to the ongoing and pervasive crisis of gender-based and sexual violence. Plans for administering regular and robust offerings in the new gender violence curriculum for Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies (WGSS) will be shared. As presenters share syllabi for three seminars, their own tools include multi-lingual historical analysis, performance as a didactic practice of resistance, and collective forms of response, praxis, and archives that recuperate local and transhistorical instances of gender violence. This work affirms that a curricular focus on gender violence, resistance, and abolition can effect cultural change that dismantles the conditions of possibility for future violence.

Influence of Psychoanalytic Theories & Dance/Movement Therapy with Survivors of Domestic Violence

Genevieve Fuller, Lesley University

Room 3-085

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Every minute, twenty people experience physical violence by an intimate partner in the United States. Domestic violence is an issue that does not discriminate based on race, gender identity, socio-economic status, religion, or sexual orientation. It is an issue that has been around since before Freud, when women experiencing abuse came to him with what we now know as typical traumatic symptomology, but were labeled as having “hysteria.” In order to make informed treatment decisions for any population, it is important to have an understanding of the history and psychotherapy of that group. Psychoanalytic theorists such as Freud and Fairbairn, when used with an informed biopsychosocial lens, offer numerous perspectives that can be used to increase understanding of domestic violence, therefore improving therapeutic services and the client-therapist relationship. Drawing on clinical material, this paper addresses how psychoanalytic theories can be applied to domestic violence work, and how dance/movement therapy can be implemented at each stage of recovery to establish safety and foster empowerment, reconnection, and resilience.

Sexual Violence Against Women in an Armed Conflict

Nowsheen Altaf Dar, National Institute of Technology, Srinagar
Benish Mehraj, University of Kashmir

Room 4-030

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Documentation of life under militarization has mostly been done by “men writing about men.” The need to have a gendered perspective of conflict and war was only recently introduced in the academic discourse after the collective violence against the women of Bosnia and Rwanda in the 1990s was given the attention it deserved by the international media. In Kashmir, women are subjected to violence through physical, sexual, and mental harassments. The very nature of the conflict has pushed Kashmiri women to the wall, putting the burden of violence on their shoulders. Women face physical and sexual assault at checkpoints, during raids, in detention centers, and prisons. Under these severe conditions, women have to assume the role of the breadwinners, while being the caretakers of the family. Women are in the context of a conflict as a “double-oppressed” category. They are at the receiving end of the violence directly, and their lives undergo a transformation indirectly as well. The psychological effects of the violence often result in the breaking of family ties, alienation, and various mental disorders such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolarity, depression, etc. This paper presents a proposed study of gender-based violence in this conflict zone to understand the gendered organization of violence under military occupation. The study includes exploratory research and recorded testimonies of women, how they have maintained themselves, and managed to survive at all costs.

Keywords : women, violence, armed conflict, Kashmir, sexual violence, depression, assault, military occupation , war.

Still I Rise: A Reply to American Violence in the Writings of Contemporary Black Women Poets

Danielle Legros Georges, Lesley University

Room 2-150 (Amphitheater)

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

This workshop focuses on the work of selected Black women poets writing resistance in the late 20th and 21st centuries. We will examine how these writers have addressed violence against black bodies, racism and war, the politics of power, black subjectivity, as well as black joy and love as antidotal to matrices of repression. Their poems – in their formal strategies and fields of focus – serve as models for the writing we will engage in ourselves. This workshop is meant as a generative one – one meant to provoke, challenge, and inspire us into discussions and ultimately poems or poem drafts. No experience in poetry writing necessary. Open to all.

The Maternal Frame & the Rise of the Counterpublic among Naga Women in India

Payel Ghosh, Jadavpur University

Room 4-030

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Nagaland, situated in the northeastern corner of India, has witnessed a violent conflict situation for more than five decades. It is a heavily militarized space with draconian laws like the Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA) in place, which allows the army personnel to go unchallenged even after committing violent war crimes. What makes this region stand out is the way few women have used their tradition-specific gendered role strategically to subvert prescribed gender norms and exhibit agency – against the violence they face for the conflict situation as well as the systemic violence that bars them from entering the public-political sphere. In Nagaland the troika of State, Church, and customary laws have created a gendered social sphere where women have been debarred from participating in the decision-making sphere. This is a society where modes of patriarchy are intertwined with militarization. This paper shows how women from the Naga tribal communities are attempting to use their tradition-specific gender roles of motherhood to gain agency and resist the formation of a hostile gendered social space.

12:00 PM

A Space to Speak

Gabrielle Arias, Lesley University
Christina Dennis, Lesley University
Stephenie Loo, Lesley University
Amy Larson McGuirk, Lesley University
Kathleen Moye, Lesley University
Chelsey O'Connor, Lesley University
Anna Rich, Lesley University
Molly Weinberg, Lesley University
Jason Butler, Lesley University

Room 2-048

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

This piece of therapeutic theatre examines the experiences and stories of eight Lesley drama therapy graduate students in relation to gender-based violence. Using dramatic tools, every individual utilizes the performance space to share their experiences as well as engage in their collective experience. The piece comes out of a project to address violence against women (with “women” being defined in broad and inclusive terms) as part of a course on performance. The pieces created in class reflected a diverse array of experiences and many took a deep dive into the variety of ways aggression and violence can manifest in the lives of women. The class experience proved to be profound and many students were inspired to continue the work in order to further the conversation. Using the tools of drama therapy and power of performance, A Space to Speak elevates the stories of eight individuals with vastly different yet strikingly unified experiences and invites the audience to examine their own stories and the many ways violence can exist in their lives. The performance will be followed by a talk back session with the audience.

Dialogue Between Scholars, Practitioners, & Artists – Integrating Research, Practice, & Art to Address Violence Against Women

Catriona Baker, Lesley University
Nancy Beardall, Lesley University
Michelle Napoli, Lesley University
Michael Rivera, Lesley University
Clara Ronderos, Lesley University

Room 2-078

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

This forum provides an opportunity for participants to share their research, practices, artwork, advocacy efforts, questions, challenges, inspirations, and aspirations.

Honor Killings: For Honor or other Motives?

Saima Jafri, University of Sindh, Jamshoro

Room 3-085

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

This research examines honor-killing, the most violent form of gender-based violence prevalent in Sindh, a province of Pakistan. Karo-Kari, or honor killing, is the homicide of a family member, typically a woman by her male family members for bringing dishonor to the family through alleged sexual transgression, free-will marriage, or having a loose moral character. The rationale behind such crimes is the understanding that family honor can be restored by killing the culprit for tarnishing the honor of the family and tribe. The overarching research question guiding this research was: Are honor killings actually killings for honor or are there other motives behind them? Data were collected using semi-structured, open-ended interviews with the family members of five female victims of honor killing in Sindh. The study employed feminist perspectives to explore and interpret the data to gain in-depth insight into the phenomena of honor killings and the motives behind them. Special attention was paid to the muted voices of women family members of the victims of honor killing. The data revealed that factors such as gender discrimination, lack of education, lack of implementation of laws and sociocultural norms are responsible for the rise of honor killings in Sindh.

Honour Deception

Aisha Gazdar, Films d’Art

Room 2-150 (Amphitheater)

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

This documentary examines the issue of the tribal custom of Honour Killing and how it is reinvented in modern-day Pakistan, mainly through the law of Qisas and Diyat (retribution and blood money). This law allows the family to make a compromise with the accused. This film won the award for Best Documentary at the second International Shorts Delhi Film Festival.

ICE Enforcement & Domestic Violence: Collaborations & Complexities

Marya Stefania Arteaga, Comunidad Colectiva

Room 4-030

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

This session presents the work of a grassroots community organization – Comunidad Colectiva – focused on advocating for and protecting the human rights of immigrants in Charlotte, NC. Topics will include immigration enforcement locally as well as federal immigration actions and legislation, and the complex implications for domestic violence cases.

Trauma Talks: An Afternoon of Arts-based Healing

Katya Zinn, Lesley University

Room 3-102

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

This workshop helps survivors of sexual violence heal through a multi-model expressive writing experiential inspired by Pennebaker’s (1986) paradigm, proposes the correlation between the practice of emotionally descriptive writing about significant trauma and improved mental and physical well-being. Subsequent applications of Pennebaker’s paradigm have demonstrated its efficacy in reducing symptoms of depression, dysphoria, and anxiety for survivors of sexual assault. Using this paradigm as the basis for this workshop, incorporating a proprioceptive writing model to facilitate somatic integration and the Psychodramatic container practice to create a safe space for participants. This workshop includes evidence supporting the efficacy of expressive writing as a means of healing in universally acceptable terms, and discussion about the different faces of violence against women (from intimate partner violence to rape by intoxication to frequently normalized coercive male sexual behavior) as a means of validating the individual experiences of participants. The expressive writing experiential will be introduced through a spoken word performance of a completed response to the prompt, which will serve as guidance and inspiration. Participants will then have the opportunity to begin writing their own responses using the proprioceptive techniques that are outlined. The workshop concludes with sharing of work from any participant who feels comfortable (though no one will be compelled to do so) and a processing session. NOTE: This workshop is open to all who identify as survivors of sexual trauma of any kind, regardless of gender identity and/or expression.

2:00 PM

Creating Rituals of Healing following Experiences of Abuse or Abortion

Susan Chorley, Exhale

Room 3-085

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

We participate in ritual everyday – from our morning routine to opening a meeting/discussion at work, to lighting a candle. In this workshop participants will define ritual and discuss the key elements of ritual. Participants will explore the importance of healing ritual in a variety of different religious and cultural traditions, and participants will participate in a ritual experience and then create a model of a ritual that could be used with survivors of abuse or individuals with abortion experiences. Ritual opens us up to creatively envisioning our experiences and making meaning out of them through movement, words, and reflection. Rituals can be elaborate or simple. At its core, a ritual experience provides an opportunity for humans to create meaning around a life experience, to more fully integrate it into our understanding of self and to promote healing. As a minister, mother, survivor, and someone with an abortion experience, I have found creating ritual experiences for myself and for individuals and communities incredibly sacred and liberating experiences. Through ritual we can acknowledge places of pain, loss, anger, or grief without shame or stigma, and we can reinvent the parts of ourselves or of our stories that have been harmed. Through ritual we bless ourselves, connect with our ancestors and multiple identities, and create a pathway to move forward in our lives.

From Ethical Distance to Empathetic Proximity: Gendered Representations of Femicide in Narratives of the Mexican-U.S. Border

Michael Martinez-Raguso, Colby College

Room 2-048

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This paper engages the representation of violence against women on the Mexico-U.S. border through the relation between space and empathy – specifically, through the movement between distance and proximity with respect to various authors’ literary treatment of the femicide crisis. Since 1993 the bodies of hundreds (if not thousands) of women and girls have been found violated and brutalized in abandoned lots in Ciudad Juárez and the surrounding desert, just across the border from El Paso – one of the safest cities in the United States. Here I will analyze the representation of femicidal violence in two border texts: Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño’s novel 2666(2004) and indigenous Chicana poet ire’ne lara silva’s short story “la huesera, or flesh to bone” (2013; orthographic convention is the author’s).

Luna morada/Black Moon

Tina Escaja, University of Vermont

Room 2-078

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

The desire to reach to the collective and denounce gender violence through art and technology lies at the heart of Luna morada/Black Moon. This piece is part of a larger project, Código de barras (Bar Codes) that involves poetry, technology, and collective art. The project was one of the segments in a feminist exhibition titled, The Only Bush I Trust is My Own, curated by Escaja in Burlington, VT in 2006. Luna morada/Black Moon consists of a poem in bilingual format on an image of a “black eye,” an image created by M.J. Tobal. With a barcode inserted in the retina of the image, a barcode reader provides the viewer with increasing sounds of a fragment of Dhrupad Dream, by vocal artist Fátima Miranda. Juxtaposing the reading of the poem with the experience of the increasing sound emphasizes perplexity, anxiety, and eventually the condemnation of gender violence.

Ma Taller 'Opu Ma 'Akkala Kennetto -- We are Waking Up Our Story Together: Arts-Based Indigenous Methodology

Michelle Napoli, Lesley University

Room 3-090

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This session is motivated by my aim to find an ethical and culturally centering approach to strengthen my identity formation process as a woman of mixed race from two sides of a story of genocide. I have ancestral lines connecting me with Coast Miwok and Southern Pomo people in what is now called California, and ancestral lines connecting me with the first Pilgrims in what is now called Massachusetts. My hope is that learning about identity formation from this inquiry can be felt as a contribution in my community and for my children, as well as to my profession. Of significance is how much my Native communities’ story of genocide has been silenced, not just in my personal life, but also systemically in society. Even more painful at times is how I have found my story and work to be only understood or received on a surface level and then taken, disregarded, or distorted. Therefore, a problem addressed in the research is how to explore and construct knowledge beyond the written word, frameworks, and dominant narratives in academic and my profession of art therapy, while also constructing a sustainable, ethical, and culturally congruent path to dive deeper into forming identity amidst a legacy of censure. From my Indigenous worldview I am engaging in Native language learning, reacquisition, and spiritually-informed communication. Through academic Western English language learning I also engage with conceptual frameworks of U.S.-based educational systems.

Rape as an Act of Genocide: History and Law

Kimberly Lowe Frank, Lesley University

Room 2-048

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

The intent of all genocides is to exterminate a group, and historically perpetrators have targeted the reproductive capabilities of the victim group in order to achieve this. I argue that the use of sexual violence during genocide correlated with perpetrator beliefs that racial, ethnic, or religious identity is determined by men. Many perpetrators have deliberately attacked their victims through sexual violence, to both impregnate victims with the perpetrator group and prevent male victims from procreating. Recognizing this is crucial to understanding how genocide has taken place and continues to take place today. This paper examines the history of sexual violence as an act of genocide, against both men and women. It covers the use of sexual violence by perpetrators during 20thC genocides, including Armenians in Ottoman, Turkey, Muslims in Bosnia, and Tutsi in Rwanda. It will also consider how these historical trends are reflected in the 21stC genocides of the Yazidi in Syria/Iraq and Rohingya in Myanmar/Burma. It will also consider the legal precedents that defined rape first as a war crime, and then as an official act of genocide under international law.

Re-claiming the patriarchal narrative: Using auto-ethnographic performance art as psycho-social commentary on womxn’s sexuality and mental health

Angelica Pinna-Perez, Lesley University
Becca Bernard, Independant Artist

Room 2-078

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Womxn’s sexuality and behaviors (in a broad sense) have been traditionally pathologized as mental health issues in the Western context. The performance art piece The Fainting Roomis an auto-ethnographic study, originally conceptualized and examined through a socio-historical lens where women were diagnosed with “female hysteria.” This arts-based research is an attempt to reclaim womxn’s sexual narratives/practices as normal and natural experiences from those originally constructed/defined by patriarchal psychological diagnostic criteria. This interactive performance/workshop will re-examine The Fainting Room through a critical, transnational lens in order to explore how internalized sexism and social constructs have shaped reality. Rather than pathologizing womxn’s sexuality as a monolithic experience that serves a heteronormative patriarchal agenda and perpetuate social-political sanctioned violence, we can reclaim a nonviolent narrative of true affirmative consent by celebrating and caring for diverse natural impulses and needs.

Sahiyo Stories

Mariya Taher, Sahiyo

2-150 (Amphitheater)

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

In 2016, Mariya created a digital story about experiencing Female Genital Cutting (FGC) and advocating against it. She subsequently fundraised to create a workshop where survivors and advocates working to end FGC could create their own digital stories. Sahiyo Stories represents advocacy work to end FGC, because for centuries, people have been afraid to speak up out of fear of social isolation/ostracization, being labeled a victim, or causing trouble for loved ones. Taher believes that this form of violence has existed within the U.S. for too long, and people are not often aware that such practices exist in this country. This film is a powerful force that honors lived experiences and breaks the silence.

The “Pedagogy of Cruelty ” in the “Putero” Narrative

Agueda GómezSuárez, University of Vigo

Room 2-048

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

This paper is focused on research regarding the sexual grammar of the narrations of prostitution customers in Spain in relation to the work of anthropologist Rita Segato, with the purpose of understanding why men pay for sex. In order to understand the causes that articulate the “putero” narrative, the discourses of prostitution customers were analyzed through semi-structured in-depth interviews, group interviews, and discussion groups. The succession of socio-sexual paradigms in our country illuminates the comprehension of this phenomenon that places Spain as the European country with the highest rate of make prostitution consumption. The stories are classified in four categories: misogynist (hates women); consumer (everything can be bought and sold); friend (affectionate but abusive); and critical (occasional and remorseful). As far as we are concerned, the purchase of sex is a strategy to reinforce masculinity based on an identity focused on exhibition in front of a group of peers.

Vision Boards – Redefining Your Journey Through Visualization

Laura Marotta, Massachusetts Art Education Association (MAEA), President
Eleena Rioux, Massachusetts Art Education Association (MAEA), Exhibitions

Room 4-030

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Women who have been through trauma, specifically violence or abusive situations, often feel a lack of control, which can permeate into their lives, even after post-treatment therapy and services. After a traumatic experience, we often need to retrain our brains and hearts by engaging with interests that are within our sphere of control. One of the most powerful activities that can aid in this transition is art-making. Making art can be a very personal, expressive, non-threatening and empowering experience. This workshop will take you through the journey of creating your own vision board, using basic art materials. Many start-ups and incubator classes use vision-boarding as a way to define and visualize a career goal. This version of a vision board is designed for an individual to express their own vision for any part of their journey; it may be centered around personal life, career, health, or something else that the client feels like expressing at the time. This simple act of having complete control over the creation of a tangible product from start to finish starts to shift and change the way the brain has been programmed, giving the artist a sense of ownership and pride, and perhaps hope for what’s ahead. You will leave this workshop with your own example of a vision board, as well as a lesson plan outlining the techniques used in the workshop so that you can teach or educate others.

3:15 PM

Demanding Accountability in Domestic Violence Courts

Johnna Pike, Newbury College - Brookline

Room 3-085

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

This presentation explores whether specialized domestic violence courts are achieving their stated objective of abuser accountability. Domestic violence emerged from the private realm of family life into the public consciousness during the 1970s. Since then, there has been a largely successful movement to reframe domestic violence as a “real” social problem necessitating meaningful criminal justice intervention. Within the criminal justice system, victim and feminist groups have mostly prevailed in controlling the discourse around domestic violence as a gender-based offense. As a result, a criminal court model aimed at empowering victims and at holding abusers accountable has emerged. However, the efficacy of the domestic court model as currently implemented in achieving abuser accountability has been questionable. Drawing from defendants’ semi-structured interviews, this paper considers the implications of reliance on this model for domestic violence victims. At its core, the court model is a process of stigmatization meant to morally shame abusers into relinquishing gendered beliefs supporting relationship violence. Abusers participating in this study were found to invoke neutralization techniques to reinterpret their violent actions in a more socially acceptable story, rather than accept responsibility. Yet the responses of abusers suggest that this model does hold possibilities for better redressing this gender-based violence, but proponents will likely have to reconsider how victims view and how abusers participate in the court process.

First Year Seminar: Research, Interpretation, and Action

Sonia Perez-Villanueva, Lesley University
Lisa Fiore, Lesley University
Lesley University Undergraduate Students

Room 2-150 (Ampitheater)

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

Students in every section of First Year Seminar, fall ’18, explored themes related to violence against women through course readings, activities, and action/advocacy projects. This session provides a forum for students to present their class’s experiences and findings, contributing to a shared understanding of the complexity of violence against women viewed through an interdisciplinary lens.

Ownership and Violence Against Women of Color Reflected Through the lens of Anglo Saxon Theology

Jennifer Herring, Lesley University
Luraine Kimmerle, Boston College

Room 3-085

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

In the American cultural mind, white bodies have been upheld as ideal. In addition, the male body has received praise, greater access, and safety on the streets, in business, education, and the wider world. In the arena of higher education students tend to discover how their personal sociocultural perspective informs ownership of the lack thereof. It is through this reality that the idea of ownership is seen when it comes to violence inflicted on/received by women. When race is included in the violence against women dialogue we uncover the branches of Anglo-Saxon Exceptionalism, planted by the theologies and worldviews of American colonizers and founders. This presentation will examine violence against women as it relates to ownership (of property and bodies) and race as well as continuing the ideals of Puritan theologies sprouting from Anglo-Saxon Exceptionalism. The core of this argument lies in the history of how black bodies have been owned in America and how the while male has “owned” rights to men of color for labor, women of color for sex, and white women for reproduction. This thread continues in our cultural imagination, excusing white men who are accused of assault, but investigating men of color more deeply. The norms that result are that white men are protected, men of color are intruders, and violence against women is natural.

Teen Dating Violence

Janessa Rivera, R.E.B.I.R.T.H. Journey, LLC

Room 4-030

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

Teen Dating Violence (TDV) is a topic rapidly increasing in the lives of our youth, however it is not discussed in the schools or in the community. Individuals who suffer from dating violence in their youth are more likely to experience domestic violence with an intimate partner as an adult. This presentation raises awareness of the term “dating violence” and highlights the impact of TDV in the Latino community in an interactive format that includes open discussion of cultural norms and appropriation in the Latino community, which can enable TDV. Healthy strategies to prevent/identify/escape TDV are also included, along with resources for session participants.

The Constituent Women of Violence against Women

Wilmer Morales, Lesley University
Jocelyn Martinez, Lesley University
Samantha Amaro, Lesley University

Room 2-078

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

The Violence against Women Initiative is a very important framework in a time in which women need a platform to be able to discuss the problems and inequality they face in society. Throughout history women have been demonized, abuse, and treated unfairly, which has affected the way women respond to acts of violence. However, recent events have allowed women to gain the courage to stand against acts including verbal, physical, emotional, and psychological abuse. Society, in general, has to be educated and be made aware of how to respond and meticulously act during events that violate the rights of women, as well as to properly punish acts of violence against women who are most vulnerable in these cases. The presentations in this session all address a form of abuse to women of different backgrounds. The panelists seek to use their papers and research to address inequality, different forms of abuse, and societal, cultural, and structural violence that women face in the United States and México. The panelists also seek to shine a light on forms of violence against women that are overseen by the justice system and often ignored by society. Women who, due to the culture and bias created around them, are affected tremendously.

Violence Against Women: Unrecognized Prevention Opportunities

Ronald Goldman, Early Trauma Prevention Center

Room 4-030

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

Our society’s response to violence against women tends to focus on treating symptoms like improving security and punishing offenders while avoiding causes and prevention. Other usual responses are self-defense training, discussing gun control and violent media, and legislation. These measures are important, but they do not address the origins of the problem. What part of the problem lies with the environment and what part lies with the violent individual? Are violent people born or made? Do events that occur before we can remember matter? Is human nature compatible with society? This presentation explores these questions, society’s attitude toward human nature, and implications for individual and social development. It challenges cultural beliefs about children and explores early environmental influences that are associated with later violent behavior. Participants will learn how these beliefs and practices are perpetuated and ideas for advocating change. Using what is known from animal and infant experiments, brain development studies, amazing anecdotes of infant behavior, and other cultures, this presentation identifies generally unrecognized important factors connected with violence. It also describes social customs and values associated with violent and peaceful cultures, including specific principles that can contribute to peace and happiness among family, friends, and the world.

Violence towards women by women: an intergenerational perspective

Eleanor Roffman, Lesley University
Bri Crocker, Justice Resource Institute
Celia Castro, The Home For Little Wanderers

Room 2-048

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

Violence towards women is a violation of human rights, and is a public health issue. It cuts across all global boundaries and identities. Our workshop utilizes a feminist, ecological framework to examine violence towards women of different age groups perpetrated by other women. We will address the impact of cultural and societal structures as well as socialized interpersonal relationships. We will present the experiences of selected women from three different life stages and cultural backgrounds to include: adolescence, young adulthood, and older adult women. In addition to examining the etiology of the abuse of women by women at these different life stages, we will explore pathways to recovery.