Author Type

Faculty

Location

U-Hall 3-100

Start Date

28-3-2018 9:10 AM

End Date

28-3-2018 10:00 AM

Presentation Type

Paper

Abstract

Purpose and Background

Dialogic talk, in which students are engaged in authentic, extended discourse where meaning is co-constructed and conceptual understanding is incrementally built, is an important aspect of English Language Development instruction (Gersten et al., 2007; Harper & de Jong, 2004; O’Connor & Michaels, 2007; Saunders & Goldenberg, 2010; Snow & Katz, 2010; Gibbons, 2015; Mercer, Dawes, & Staarman, 2009). Supported by Russell and Faculty Development Grants, this study examines how teacher language use in an inquiry-based science unit both facilitated and constrained dialogic talk in a Kindergarten ELD classroom in a Two-Way Dual Language context.

Specifically, I ask:

  • In what ways are emerging bilingual students engaged in authentic, extended discourse during a science unit in ELD class?
  • How does an ELD teacher’s language use facilitate and/or constrain students’ opportunities for engaging in authentic, extended discourse during this unit?

Methodology

This qualitative case study draws on three, one-hour observations of a Kindergarten ELD class selected from a larger study. This smaller study examines Kindergarteners' language use as they engaged in hands-on, experiential lessons in a “Solids and Liquids” unit. I audio recorded whole-group and small-group interactions and used a combination of inductive and deductive coding (Miles, Huberman, & Saldaña, 2014) to examine both the nature of the students’ interactions and the role of teacher language in constraining and/or supporting extended discourse.

Results and Significance

Preliminary results suggest that a combination of strategic questioning and inquiry-based, hands-on science activities facilitated opportunities for dialogic talk. Nevertheless, traditional monologic patterns of teacher talk persisted at times. Examples of teacher and student language are provided. Implications for both content and language learning are discussed, including the role of teacher facilitation in student interaction.

References

Gersten, R., Baker, S. K., Shanahan, T., Linan-Thompson, S., Collins, P., & Scarcella, R. (2007). Effective Literacy and English Language Instruction for English Learners in the Elementary Grades: A Practice Guide. NCEE 2007-4011. Washington, D.C. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee

Gibbons, P. (2015). Scaffolding language, scaffolding learning: Teaching English language learners in the mainstream classroom (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Harper, C., & Jong, E. (2004). Misconceptions About Teaching English-language Learners. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 48(2), 152–162. http://doi.org/10.1598/JAAL.48.2.6

Mercer, N., Dawes, L., & Staarman, J. K. (2009). Dialogic teaching in the primary science classroom. Language and Education, 23(4), 353–369. http://doi.org/10.1080/09500780902954273

Miles, M. B., Huberman, A. M., & Saldaña, J. (2014). Qualitative data analysis: A methods sourcebook. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications.

O’Connor, C., & Michaels, S. (2007). When is dialogue “dialogic”? Human Development, 50(5), 275–285. http://doi.org/10.1159/000106415

Saunders, W., & Goldenberg, C. (2010). Research to guide English language devleopment instruction. In Improving Education for English Learners: Research-Based Approaches (pp. 21–80). Sacramento: California Department of Education.

Snow, M. A., & Katz, K. (2010). English language development: Foundations and Implementation in kindergarten through grade 5. In D. Dolson & L. Burnham-Massey (Eds.), Improving education for English learners: Research-based approaches (pp. 83–148). Sacramento: CDE Press.

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Examining opportunities for dialogic talk in a Kindergarten English Language Development classroom

U-Hall 3-100

Purpose and Background

Dialogic talk, in which students are engaged in authentic, extended discourse where meaning is co-constructed and conceptual understanding is incrementally built, is an important aspect of English Language Development instruction (Gersten et al., 2007; Harper & de Jong, 2004; O’Connor & Michaels, 2007; Saunders & Goldenberg, 2010; Snow & Katz, 2010; Gibbons, 2015; Mercer, Dawes, & Staarman, 2009). Supported by Russell and Faculty Development Grants, this study examines how teacher language use in an inquiry-based science unit both facilitated and constrained dialogic talk in a Kindergarten ELD classroom in a Two-Way Dual Language context.

Specifically, I ask:

  • In what ways are emerging bilingual students engaged in authentic, extended discourse during a science unit in ELD class?
  • How does an ELD teacher’s language use facilitate and/or constrain students’ opportunities for engaging in authentic, extended discourse during this unit?

Methodology

This qualitative case study draws on three, one-hour observations of a Kindergarten ELD class selected from a larger study. This smaller study examines Kindergarteners' language use as they engaged in hands-on, experiential lessons in a “Solids and Liquids” unit. I audio recorded whole-group and small-group interactions and used a combination of inductive and deductive coding (Miles, Huberman, & Saldaña, 2014) to examine both the nature of the students’ interactions and the role of teacher language in constraining and/or supporting extended discourse.

Results and Significance

Preliminary results suggest that a combination of strategic questioning and inquiry-based, hands-on science activities facilitated opportunities for dialogic talk. Nevertheless, traditional monologic patterns of teacher talk persisted at times. Examples of teacher and student language are provided. Implications for both content and language learning are discussed, including the role of teacher facilitation in student interaction.

References

Gersten, R., Baker, S. K., Shanahan, T., Linan-Thompson, S., Collins, P., & Scarcella, R. (2007). Effective Literacy and English Language Instruction for English Learners in the Elementary Grades: A Practice Guide. NCEE 2007-4011. Washington, D.C. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee

Gibbons, P. (2015). Scaffolding language, scaffolding learning: Teaching English language learners in the mainstream classroom (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Harper, C., & Jong, E. (2004). Misconceptions About Teaching English-language Learners. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 48(2), 152–162. http://doi.org/10.1598/JAAL.48.2.6

Mercer, N., Dawes, L., & Staarman, J. K. (2009). Dialogic teaching in the primary science classroom. Language and Education, 23(4), 353–369. http://doi.org/10.1080/09500780902954273

Miles, M. B., Huberman, A. M., & Saldaña, J. (2014). Qualitative data analysis: A methods sourcebook. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications.

O’Connor, C., & Michaels, S. (2007). When is dialogue “dialogic”? Human Development, 50(5), 275–285. http://doi.org/10.1159/000106415

Saunders, W., & Goldenberg, C. (2010). Research to guide English language devleopment instruction. In Improving Education for English Learners: Research-Based Approaches (pp. 21–80). Sacramento: California Department of Education.

Snow, M. A., & Katz, K. (2010). English language development: Foundations and Implementation in kindergarten through grade 5. In D. Dolson & L. Burnham-Massey (Eds.), Improving education for English learners: Research-based approaches (pp. 83–148). Sacramento: CDE Press.