Author Type

Faculty

Location

U-Hall 3-094

Start Date

28-3-2018 4:10 PM

End Date

28-3-2018 5:00 PM

Presentation Type

Panel

Abstract

As today’s youth blossom into adulthood, they will simultaneously be challenged to develop their sense of self/identity and to cultivate their ability to embrace differences, all while being bombarded by visual media and messaging. Research literature on perspective taking provides a framework by which students can develop an understanding of their own perspective, imagine the world from an “other” perspective, and make connections that link to productive actions (Selman, 1971). Perspective taking as a concept has been linked to greater empathy, compassion, and prosocial behavior (Hardwood and Farrar, 2006). Yet the mechanism for enabling productive perspective taking is unclear. In this presentation we will demonstrate the use of visualization as a mechanism for understanding other people, places, and cultures across two distinct courses in different disciplines. Students in these classes were challenged to 1.) Analyze characters, scenes, or moments within a play and demonstrate their ability to “see” that work in a new way through visual representations and 2.) Step into someone else’s shoes and visualize what things they might think, feel, say, or do within a particular context.

Harwood, Michelle D.; Farrar, M. Jeffrey (2006). "Conflicting emotions: The connection between affective perspective taking and theory of mind". British Journal of Developmental Psychology. 24 (2): 401–418.

Selman, Robert L. (1971). "Taking Another's Perspective: Role-Taking Development in Early Childhood". Child Development. 42 (6): 1721–1734.

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Mar 28th, 4:10 PM Mar 28th, 5:00 PM

Empathizing with “the other”: Visualization and perspective taking

U-Hall 3-094

As today’s youth blossom into adulthood, they will simultaneously be challenged to develop their sense of self/identity and to cultivate their ability to embrace differences, all while being bombarded by visual media and messaging. Research literature on perspective taking provides a framework by which students can develop an understanding of their own perspective, imagine the world from an “other” perspective, and make connections that link to productive actions (Selman, 1971). Perspective taking as a concept has been linked to greater empathy, compassion, and prosocial behavior (Hardwood and Farrar, 2006). Yet the mechanism for enabling productive perspective taking is unclear. In this presentation we will demonstrate the use of visualization as a mechanism for understanding other people, places, and cultures across two distinct courses in different disciplines. Students in these classes were challenged to 1.) Analyze characters, scenes, or moments within a play and demonstrate their ability to “see” that work in a new way through visual representations and 2.) Step into someone else’s shoes and visualize what things they might think, feel, say, or do within a particular context.

Harwood, Michelle D.; Farrar, M. Jeffrey (2006). "Conflicting emotions: The connection between affective perspective taking and theory of mind". British Journal of Developmental Psychology. 24 (2): 401–418.

Selman, Robert L. (1971). "Taking Another's Perspective: Role-Taking Development in Early Childhood". Child Development. 42 (6): 1721–1734.