Proposal Title

Public Art within a Changing Political Environment

Author Type

Faculty

Location

U-Hall 3-101

Start Date

28-3-2018 3:10 PM

End Date

28-3-2018 4:00 PM

Presentation Type

Paper

Abstract

“Public Art within a Changing Political Environment" looks at how Austria’s changing political landscape impacts funding for public memory projects. As an Austrian citizen and granddaughter of Holocaust victims, I am pursuing a reiteration of The Vienna Project’s “Naming Memorial,” that was installed in the courtyard of Austria’s National Library at the Hofburg Palace in 2014. Using scroll slides, I projected the names of 91,780 persecuted victims groups of National Socialism, representing 7 different groups, onto the walls of the buildings surrounding Josefplatz. The paper evaluates support for a sequel project at Austria’s War Memorial in Vienna’s first district. The project proposal addresses lapses in Austria’s public art program and asks the question: “What happens when we forget to remember?” Methodologies include interviews, archival research, collaborations with designers, metal fabricators, laser engineers, and augmented reality technologists. I hope to create a new generation of naming memorials that includes a spectrum of new technologies, bringing context and story-telling to an otherwise stark listing of names. Audiences will include Austrian officials, family members, students, artists, historians, community members and tourists.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Mar 28th, 3:10 PM Mar 28th, 4:00 PM

Public Art within a Changing Political Environment

U-Hall 3-101

“Public Art within a Changing Political Environment" looks at how Austria’s changing political landscape impacts funding for public memory projects. As an Austrian citizen and granddaughter of Holocaust victims, I am pursuing a reiteration of The Vienna Project’s “Naming Memorial,” that was installed in the courtyard of Austria’s National Library at the Hofburg Palace in 2014. Using scroll slides, I projected the names of 91,780 persecuted victims groups of National Socialism, representing 7 different groups, onto the walls of the buildings surrounding Josefplatz. The paper evaluates support for a sequel project at Austria’s War Memorial in Vienna’s first district. The project proposal addresses lapses in Austria’s public art program and asks the question: “What happens when we forget to remember?” Methodologies include interviews, archival research, collaborations with designers, metal fabricators, laser engineers, and augmented reality technologists. I hope to create a new generation of naming memorials that includes a spectrum of new technologies, bringing context and story-telling to an otherwise stark listing of names. Audiences will include Austrian officials, family members, students, artists, historians, community members and tourists.